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for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
, the technology revolution. and one reason i think that it's really pretty clear that those are key drivers is this is a global phenomenon. and i do sometimes think the american discourse about it tends to be very american. so i'm always quite entertained when i read about, you know, a paper that says rising income inequality in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, h
are free. >> these kinds of smartphone technologies have the potential for a lot of good but the potential for a lot of harm too in terms of embarrassment, unwanted disclosures or discomfort from being tracked. >> reporter: gibson can't get over how easy it was for him and his daughter to be tracked. what's it make you think about? >> if he can find me anybody can. >> reporter: app developers are responding by adding disclosures and written policies which it turns out almost nobody reads. if you read each policy for every website or application you use this year it could take three months of your life. for "cbs this morning," sharyl attkisson, washington. >>> david kirkpatrick is founder and ceo of a media company that focuses on the role of technology in business and society. david, good to see you. >> thanks for having me. >> why does angry birds need to know where we are? >> excellent question and great report. they want to be able to charge more for the ads they sell to their advertisers and it's understandable, but i think that report really points
upgrades to the car itself in terms of the engine. there need to be technology upgrades keep prices down not there yet. grocery and grain. a lot of folks going to be the grocery store are going to notice these things. what particular products. >> talked about the milk cliff that's something that's certainly a risk this year just because of the fiscal cliff and could see milk prices more than double. but just because of the drought this year. we're seeing prices for a lot of things go up. obviously grains being a big one but then you think about all of the animals that eat grains and then that makes meat prices go up. dairy. and then that trickles down into all sorts of processed food. this is something we see almost every year. some of the experts we talked to said they are seeing potentially smaller increases that's settling out. still about 6% next year. >> clayton: in the tech field we are going to see some things going up as well. high end televisions. home theater systems and computers set to go up as well? >> always something new coming out. starting to see the roll out of ultra hi
, to information, technology to student and teacher training. this multi-faceted program will be developed by the very best spirits in the field. -- experts in the field. former congressman hutchison will lead this program. with a budget provided by the n.r.a. on whatever scope the task requires. host: that was wayne lapierre, n.r.a. executive vice president in a news conference here in washington yesterday. more on the discussion and response by the n.r.a. this is steve from covington, georgia on our line for independents. steve, you're on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. i'd like to say to your last caller. i've got two little girls. they are twins, 7 years old. they came running in here crying and i got up to see what they were watching, and they were calling for blood in the streets. the union was calling for blood in the streets up there, and it scared them to death. they said daddy, are they going to kill us? i said, no, i don't think. so if we're going to have to limit our clitches to 10 bullets, the union is going to have to limit their members to 10 people, because
-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanket, throw it over top of them, and unless you walked right into them, you wouldn't know that they were there. >> reporter: so what was once firmly in the world of make-believe, could quickly become quite real. and the science is in the special fabric, so you don't need a power source or some instruction manual to make it work. theoretically, any soldier, even in the most remote location could quickly put it on and put it to work. chris lawrence, cnn, the pentagon. >>> this week, we're looking back at 2012's top stories. cnn's ali velshi and christine romans put together a review of the year's top ten business stories, and you're going to notice a pattern. with only a few exceptions, the year in politics heavily
to miniaturized technology, which is a key step in building a nuclear weapons program. but of course, we are now just waiting to find out if kim jong-un will take another step and conduct a third nuclear test. back to you. gregg: david is live in bangkok. thank you so much, david. heather: with more on this, let's bring in the director of japan studies at the american enterprise institute. thank you for joining us and i thank you for having me. hello, heather. heather: you have this article that you wrote for the national review online. the very first line of your article says this. save yourself a few precious minutes and ignoring everything that the u.s. government says about north korea. so what is going on? >> welcome the truth is we don't know what is going on. we are pretty clueless about north korea. all we know is that when it's time fore holidays and for us to relax, north korea will do something crazy like launching rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8